Wildlife Wonders
Lions are the only cats that live in groups, which are called prides. Prides are family units that may include up to three males, a dozen or so females, and their young. All of a pride’s lionesses are related, and female cubs typically stay with the group as they age. Young males eventually leave and establish their own prides by taking over a group headed by another male.
Only male lions boast manes, the impressive fringe of long hair that encircles their heads. Males defend the pride’s territory, which may include some 100 square miles (259 square kilometers) of grasslands, scrub, or open woodlands. These intimidating animals mark the area with urine, roar menacingly to warn intruders, and chase off animals that encroach on their turf.
Female lions are the pride’s primary hunters. They often work together to prey upon antelopes, zebras, wildebeest, and other large animals of the open grasslands. Many of these animals are faster than lions, so teamwork pays off.
After the hunt, the group effort often degenerates to squabbling over the sharing of the kill, with cubs at the bottom of the pecking order. Young lions do not help to hunt until they are about a year old. Lions will hunt alone if the opportunity presents itself, and they also steal kills from hyenas or wild dogs.
Here’s some more incredible Lion-themed art from the Wildlife Wonders Collection: http://www.wildlifewonders.com/lions.html

Lions are the only cats that live in groups, which are called prides. Prides are family units that may include up to three males, a dozen or so females, and their young. All of a pride’s lionesses are related, and female cubs typically stay with the group as they age. Young males eventually leave and establish their own prides by taking over a group headed by another male.

Only male lions boast manes, the impressive fringe of long hair that encircles their heads. Males defend the pride’s territory, which may include some 100 square miles (259 square kilometers) of grasslands, scrub, or open woodlands. These intimidating animals mark the area with urine, roar menacingly to warn intruders, and chase off animals that encroach on their turf.

Female lions are the pride’s primary hunters. They often work together to prey upon antelopes, zebras, wildebeest, and other large animals of the open grasslands. Many of these animals are faster than lions, so teamwork pays off.

After the hunt, the group effort often degenerates to squabbling over the sharing of the kill, with cubs at the bottom of the pecking order. Young lions do not help to hunt until they are about a year old. Lions will hunt alone if the opportunity presents itself, and they also steal kills from hyenas or wild dogs.


Here’s some more incredible Lion-themed art from the Wildlife Wonders Collection: http://www.wildlifewonders.com/lions.html

 
There is that great proverb—that until the lions have their own historians, the history of the hunt will always glorify the hunter… Once I realized that, I had to be a writer.
– Chinua Achebe
There is that great proverb—that until the lions have their own historians, the history of the hunt will always glorify the hunter… Once I realized that, I had to be a writer.
– Chinua Achebe

What makes lions unique? Aside from their mighty size and elegant beauty, lions actually have a lot of interesting social tendencies that separate them from other cat species. 

Unlike most cats who live a generally solitary existence, the lion has developed a social system based on teamwork and a division of labor within the pride. They exist in an extended but closed family unit centered around a gr

oup of related females. The average pride consists of about 15 individuals, including five to 10 females with their young and two or three territorial males that are usually brothers or pride mates.
Lion, tiger, or leopard?

funnywildlife:

The Three Kings!! From left: African lion ‘Notch’, star of Disney’s African Cats, on the Masai Mara; Bengal tiger female in India; and African leopard, Masai Mara by Andy Rouse

Lion, tiger, or leopard?

funnywildlife:

The Three Kings!!

From left: African lion ‘Notch’, star of Disney’s African Cats, on the Masai Mara; Bengal tiger female in India; and African leopard, Masai Mara

by Andy Rouse