Wildlife Wonders
Lions are the only cats that live in groups, which are called prides. Prides are family units that may include up to three males, a dozen or so females, and their young. All of a pride’s lionesses are related, and female cubs typically stay with the group as they age. Young males eventually leave and establish their own prides by taking over a group headed by another male.
Only male lions boast manes, the impressive fringe of long hair that encircles their heads. Males defend the pride’s territory, which may include some 100 square miles (259 square kilometers) of grasslands, scrub, or open woodlands. These intimidating animals mark the area with urine, roar menacingly to warn intruders, and chase off animals that encroach on their turf.
Female lions are the pride’s primary hunters. They often work together to prey upon antelopes, zebras, wildebeest, and other large animals of the open grasslands. Many of these animals are faster than lions, so teamwork pays off.
After the hunt, the group effort often degenerates to squabbling over the sharing of the kill, with cubs at the bottom of the pecking order. Young lions do not help to hunt until they are about a year old. Lions will hunt alone if the opportunity presents itself, and they also steal kills from hyenas or wild dogs.
Here’s some more incredible Lion-themed art from the Wildlife Wonders Collection: http://www.wildlifewonders.com/lions.html

Lions are the only cats that live in groups, which are called prides. Prides are family units that may include up to three males, a dozen or so females, and their young. All of a pride’s lionesses are related, and female cubs typically stay with the group as they age. Young males eventually leave and establish their own prides by taking over a group headed by another male.

Only male lions boast manes, the impressive fringe of long hair that encircles their heads. Males defend the pride’s territory, which may include some 100 square miles (259 square kilometers) of grasslands, scrub, or open woodlands. These intimidating animals mark the area with urine, roar menacingly to warn intruders, and chase off animals that encroach on their turf.

Female lions are the pride’s primary hunters. They often work together to prey upon antelopes, zebras, wildebeest, and other large animals of the open grasslands. Many of these animals are faster than lions, so teamwork pays off.

After the hunt, the group effort often degenerates to squabbling over the sharing of the kill, with cubs at the bottom of the pecking order. Young lions do not help to hunt until they are about a year old. Lions will hunt alone if the opportunity presents itself, and they also steal kills from hyenas or wild dogs.


Here’s some more incredible Lion-themed art from the Wildlife Wonders Collection: http://www.wildlifewonders.com/lions.html

Known for their agile grace and coastal habitat, the beautiful Avocet brings elegance to life. The four species of avocets are considered waders in the same avian family as the stilts.
Avocets have long legs and long, thin, upcurved bills which they sweep from side to side when feeding in the wetlands where they typically live. Members of this genus have webbed feet and readily swim. Their diet consists of aquatic insects and other small creatures. They nest on the ground in loose colonies.

See art inspired by this beautiful bird: http://bit.ly/1aMUXaz

Known for their agile grace and coastal habitat, the beautiful Avocet brings elegance to life. The four species of avocets are considered waders in the same avian family as the stilts.

Avocets have long legs and long, thin, upcurved bills which they sweep from side to side when feeding in the wetlands where they typically live. Members of this genus have webbed feet and readily swim. Their diet consists of aquatic insects and other small creatures. They nest on the ground in loose colonies.

See art inspired by this beautiful bird: http://bit.ly/1aMUXaz

Tips from the International Wolf Center on how to keep safe and protect wild animals you come across this summer on vacation or elsewhere!

http://www.wolf.org/wolves/news/live_news_detail.asp?id=8644

* Feed pets indoors so you don’t attract wolves and other wild animals. 

* Supervise pets at all times (especially camping).

* If you come across a wolf in the wild, use caution and do not approach.

 If you encounter a wolf that appears habituated, raise your arms and wave them in the air to make yourself look larger, and make noise and/or throw objects at the wolf.  This is not to harm the animal, but in attempt to undue the habituation which is dangerous for both wolves and humans. 

 

Awwww.

Awwww.

Blue crabs are found in brackish coastal lagoons and estuaries from Nova Scotia, through the Gulf of Mexico, and as far south as Uruguay. A close relative of the shrimp and lobster, this bottom-dwelling omnivore has a prickly disposition and can be quick to use its sharp front pincers for attack or defense. The shells of large males can reach up to 9 inches wide.

They feed on almost anything they can get hold of, including mussels, snails, fish, plants, and even carrion and smaller blue crabs. They are also excellent swimmers, with specially adapted hind appendages shaped like paddles.

See more unique blue crab and crab art, sculptures, tapestries, and more in our collection: http://www.wildlifewonders.com/crabs.html